Quarmby research and writing consultancy

Consultancy work for news organisations, think tanks and charities

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Katharine also accepts commissions to write or edit research reports for think-tanks, corporates and not-for-profits, including the Institute for Public Policy Research (on reform of the House of Lords, where she worked for nearly three years), in 2008, for the charity Scope, on the murder of disabled people, the think-tank Policy Exchange, on schools and, in 2013, about carers for the new think-tank, the Centre for the Modern Family.

More recently Katharine has worked as a consultant in the media industry, for New York University’s Membership Puzzle Project and for the Bureau of Investigative Journalism, advising on both membership and engagement.

She researched engaged newsrooms around the world, interviewing senior newsroom leaders and then co-wrote an extensively shared, international report on how to involve members and supports in journalism by providing a toolkit of engagement options. You can read the report here.

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Previously to that, Katharine worked as consultant engagement editor to the Bureau of Investigative Journalism in London, scoping how the Bureau engaged with communities ranging from citizens, to local journalists, coders and specialists. She then wrote an internal 75 page report with recommendations on how to move to a deeper supporter model, with advice on using analytics, developing growth targets, deepening external comms, and proposing the best customer relationship management system for the organisation. You can read her blog that kicked off the project here.

In January 2018 the Bureau of Investigation published an extensive report looking at journalism and impact, written by the journalist, Christopher Hird and edited by Katharine. Katharine also designed the report, with support from colleague Juliet Nagillah for the cover image design. It was funded by the foundation, Adessium.

You can read Katharine’s blog on the report, here

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The link to the full report is here:

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Also recently, Katharine wrote, edited and designed the Bureau of Investigative Journalism’s 2017 Impact Report, which you can see here.

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THINK TANK/CHARITY REPORTS
2013 (June 2013) Families That Care: Centre for the Modern Family
2011: (editor) Research and development of resource tools to address the needs of disabled black, minority ethnic, and refugee people accessing services and support in London (Inclusion London)
2008: Building Blocks: Policy Exchange (report arguing for the reform of the Building Schools for the Future programme, which was then subsequently axed)
2008: Getting Away with Murder: Scope (report investigating the spectrum of crimes against disabled people in the UK and arguing for better recognition)
2005: (pro-bono editor and translator) Survival Against the Odds: Rwanda Survivors Group
1997: Straight to the Senate: Institute for Public Policy Research (report arguing for an elected second chamber)

Her investigative report, Building Blocks, on Building Schools for the Future, the programme to renew the secondary school estate questioned the cost and efficacy of the drive towards “educational transformation”. Katharine’s research team interviewed over 50 education specialists for the report. In the same year Katharine wrote a ground-breaking investigative report, Getting Away with Murder, on disability hate crime, for the charities Scope and UKDPC, which led to her commission for a book on the subject, Scapegoat. You can read further about her investigations here. You can contact Katharine on the contact page of this website regarding commissions for features, investigations, speeches, reports and interviews.

She also regularly takes part in and has chaired round-table debates for magazines and think-tanks. You can contact her to arrange interviews, articles, investigations and reports on this website through the contact page.

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